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Growing Knowledge

by sterilli on ‎09-21-2010 03:16 PM (553 Views)

Tomorrow is the first day of autumn and while it still feels like July here in Georgia, my activities are definitely grounded in the change of seasons.  I spend a good deal of time with final summer garden harvest, selecting and planting cool weather veggies, and prepping fallow areas of the garden for the months leading to spring planting.   My other focus is on the autumn and winter checklist for the house; servicing the furnace and checking the fireplace, weatherproofing windows and doors, and keeping the gutters free of leaves. 

 

For the past few years I have kept a house and garden journal and most recently found this to be a tremendous resource as the seasons change.   Initially, the journal was a place to keep my checklists and reminders for important chores, sketches and logs for what was planted where in the garden, and also where I stored seasonal tools and resources.   Over the years the journal has become a personal knowledge center for my home and family. 

 

I now spend as much time in reflection with this well-worn notebook as I do in preparation:  “What worked well?  Which tomato varieties thrived and provided the best yield?  Everyone really enjoyed Betty’s jalapeno preserve recipe we made last summer.  How did we clean the tools so well the year we had all the rain?”.  Just as important, however, are reviewing the things which did not turn out so well:  “Is there a better location for growing the sweet peppers and basil?  There were a lot of other things we should have done to the soil before planting those shrubs.  Glazing the dining room window was not enough to keep out the draft.  Try pecan wood for smoking the chipotle next year.”  The reason this has become such a valuable resource to me and my family is our dedication to reviewing and appending it and keeping good notes.

 

Our customers, partners and support team use our Sage Knowledgebase and Online Community in much the same way.   We share what we learn from our support experiences, confirm best practices and also provide feedback on technical and business solutions: “What worked well?  What did not work so well?  Is there a better way to do this?”  The knowledgebase team and community moderators are reviewing posts and feedback throughout each weekday and work closely to coordinate shared knowledge and assure quality updates to our online documentation.  One of the most valuable sources of new content and updates is shared feedback from customers, partners and Sage employees. 

 

When you are using the Sage Knowledgebase and something in particular worked well, a keyword did not help locate the right solution, or you found an easier way to solve an issue, consider sharing your feedback.  This feedback is easy to submit from the bottom of every knowledgebase article.  Here is how:

 

1) Locate the “How well did this answer your question?”.  Select a rating (0-100%) and click Submit Rating.

 


 

2) When the feedback box appears, type your suggestion(s) in the "How Could this Answer be Improved?" box.   Providing your email address can help if the reviewer needs additional information to assure the accuracy of the content update.

 

 

 

Feedback for any Community post is easy, too.  In the lower right hand corner of each post or solution, there is a series of action icons that allow you to select what feedback you would like to share: Kudos for solution providers, Reply directly if the solution was appropriate or not so, or Accept a solution when an issue is resolved or is a best practice opportunity. 

 

    

 

Community and Knowledgebase users share a wealth of experience and expertise.  We all benefit with detailed solutions or quick feedback on the shared content within these resources.  Season after season, release after release, we return to these repositories and find tremendous value in what we have documented well beyond the checklists and reminders.    Thanks for your continued help in sustaining and improving our shared knowledge. 

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