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Prelude to Correct Synchronization

New Member
Posts: 1
Country: United States

Prelude to Correct Synchronization

1) 1 x Server as Master Database; 2 x laptops

2) Act! 2009 version installed; also using "Act! for Dummies" (for 2008 version)

3) Sales laptop uses Contacts for Clients who pay $$

4) Clinical laptop uses Contacts for Residents who receivedservice

Problem 1: Cannot get Sales to synchronize with Master D despite following on-screen and book instructions

Problem 2: Can Sales and Clinical both use Contact fields with different data and have them merge?

                 If not, is it appropriate to configure all fields in Master Database first (i.e. before synchronization)?

If answer to Problem 2 is YES, is it best to wipe out Master D and begin again?

Thanks

 

Bronze Super Contributor
Posts: 1,170
Country: USA

Re: Prelude to Correct Synchronization

If I am understanding what you are saying, it sounds like you have databases that were created independently and want to sync.

 

If this is the case, you will not be able to do this via a sync.  Beginning with Act! 2005, databases that will synchronize all have to be created from the Master database.

 

To pull off what you want to do, you will need to create a database that will be a master, customized to have the fields needed from both the sales database and the clinical database.  You will then need to import the records from each of the databases in to the master, mapping the fields correctly.

 

Once you have all of the records in the new master, you will then create remote databases from the master- one for sales, one for clinical, and implement them on their respective machines.

 

Likely you will also want to create custom layouts for each job responsibility so that the staff sees just the fields that are needed by them.

 

Head to the Act! support knowledge base at help.act.com and search on syncrhonization, importing and consolidating databases for the specific steps to take.

 

Or, you might want to call a local ACC to make sure it is completed correctly for you.